600 CITY BUILDINGS FOUND CONDEMNED

“600 CITY BUILDINGS FOUND CONDEMNED: Supervisor Of Inspectors Reports 400 Are ‘Menace To Public Safety’ Structures Are Being Demolished As Rapidly As Possible, Sheesley Says.” The Sun (1837-1990). April 20, 1937.


600 CITY BUILDINGS FOUND CONDEMNED

Supervisor Of Inspectors Reports 400 Are “Menace To Public Safety”

Structures Are Being Demolished As Rapidly As Possible, Sheesley Says

There are approximately 600 officially condemned houses and other buildings, 400 of which are “a menace to public safety,” standing in Baltimore, D. D. Sheesley, supervisor of inspectors, Bureau of Buildings, said yesterday.

The bureau is having the structures torn down as rapidly as possible, Mr. Sheesley asserted, and probably all will be demolished, within six weeks. The work is being done by private contractors after public bidding.

Mr. Sheesley said he did not know how many of the 600 condemned properties are owned by the city. Since the first of the year twenty-nine structures have been torn down, and of this total the city owned eighteen.

125 Fall In Year Last Year

125 buildings, including 68 owned by the city, were torn down after condemnation. On the basis of these figures, the city probably owns more than half of the 600 condemned properties now standing.

All of the condemned structures owned by the city were taken over following tax sales. Since they were acquired, municipal officials have been, trying to sell them.

Interest in the number of condemned buildings standing was aroused again Sunday when a city-owned tax sale house in the 1000 block Hillock alley’ collapsed. The structure was on the city’s condemned list last June.

Work Ordered Speeded

During the last few years, several condemned buildings have collapsed before the city tore them down. Mayor Jackson has given orders to speed up the demolition work.

No attempt is made to salvage materials from a building the city takes over at a tax sale and tears down. In such cases the debris is allowed to remain at the site.

In explanation of this procedure, Mr. Sheesley said the city had encountered legal difficulties in the past when the materials were sold.

To avoid such troubles, Mr. Sheesley said, the city makes no attempt to sell the materials. He pointed out, however, that the debris was rarely worth more than a few dollars.